Testing the technology acceptance model for evaluating healthcare professionals' intention to use an adverse event reporting system

Jen Her Wu, Wen Shen Shen, Li Min Lin, Robert Greenes, David W. Bates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many healthcare organizations have implemented adverse event reporting systems in the hope of learning from experience to prevent adverse events and medical errors. However, a number of these applications have failed or not been implemented as predicted. Objective: This study presents an extended technology acceptance model that integrates variables connoting trust and management support into the model to investigate what determines acceptance of adverse event reporting systems by healthcare professionals. Method: The proposed model was empirically tested using data collected from a survey in the hospital environment. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed to examine the reliability and validity of the measurement model, and a structural equation modeling technique was used to evaluate the causal model. Results: The results indicated that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norm, and trust had a significant effect on a professional's intention to use an adverse event reporting system. Among them, subjective norm had the most contribution (total effect). Perceived ease of use and subjective norm also had a direct effect on perceived usefulness and trust, respectively. Management support had a direct effect on perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and subjective norm. Conclusion: The proposed model provides a means to understand what factors determine the behavioral intention of healthcare professionals to use an adverse event reporting system and how this may affect future use. In addition, understanding the factors contributing to behavioral intent may potentially be used in advance of system development to predict reporting systems acceptance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal for Quality in Health Care
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

reporting system
acceptance
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
event
Hope
Medical Errors
Structural Models
Reproducibility of Results
Statistical Factor Analysis
Learning
system development
management
factor analysis
learning
experience

Keywords

  • Patient safety
  • Reporting systems
  • Technology acceptance model
  • Trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Testing the technology acceptance model for evaluating healthcare professionals' intention to use an adverse event reporting system. / Wu, Jen Her; Shen, Wen Shen; Lin, Li Min; Greenes, Robert; Bates, David W.

In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, Vol. 20, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 123-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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