Testing a multi-stage screening system: Predicting performance on australia's national achievement test using teachers' ratings of academic and social behaviors

Ryan J. Kettler, Stephen Elliott, Michael Davies, Patrick Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study addresses the predictive validity of results from a screening system of academic enablers, with a sample of Australian elementary school students, when the criterion variable is end-of-year achievement. The investigation included (a) comparing the predictive validity of a brief criterion-referenced nomination system with more comprehensive behavior ratings, and (b) determining the optimal combination of scores to gather from this system for identifying academic difficulties. Students (n = 360) were rated using both the Performance Screening Guides (PSGs; Elliott & Gresham, 2007) and the Rating Scales (Gresham & Elliott, 2008) of the Social Skills Improvement System. The PSGs were highly sensitive (0.95) predictors of below minimum standard performance on the national test. The Rating Scales, including the brief academic competence scale in particular, added predictive value in most domains. The discussion addresses implications of these findings for school psychologists and other educators interested in the role of social behaviors as academic enablers and predictors of academic achievement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-111
Number of pages19
JournalSchool Psychology International
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • academic enablers
  • predictive validity
  • screening
  • social skills
  • teacher ratings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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