Temporal separation between philopatric juvenile pikas and their parents limits behavioural conflict

Andrew T. Smith, Barbara L. Ivins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Most juvenile pikas, Ochotoma princeps, in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado remain on the home ranges of their parents throughout the summer of their birth and eventually settle close to their natal home range. Because conflicts potentially exist between these philopatric young and their individually territorial parents, tests were done to see whether periods of juvenile activity on parental territories were independent of adult activity. Data were gathered with focal-animal sampling on a fully marked population of pikas during July and August in 1980 and 1981. Juvenile activity on the territory of a parent was dependent on parental activity; juveniles were most likely to be active when their parents were inactive. The temporal separation between parents and juveniles appears doubly advantageous in that it allows juveniles to avoid adult aggression and may facilitate their settlement nearby.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1210-1214
Number of pages5
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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