Temperature-dependent electron transport through silver nanocrystal superlattices

R. Christopher Doty, Hongbin Yu, C. Ken Shih, Brian A. Korgel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Temperature-dependent electron transport was measured through three-dimensional close-packed alkanethiol-stabilized silver nanocrystal arrays using interdigitated array electrodes. Nanocrystals ranging from 35 to 77 Å in diameter with Coulomb blockade energies well above kT were studied. The nanocrystal superlattices exhibit linear current-voltage behavior for temperatures as low as 70 K. Ordered face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattices exhibit a positive temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR), characteristic of a metal, at temperatures above approximately 225 to 245 K, depending on the particle size. The values of the conductivity, on the order of 10-6 to 10-7 Ω-1 cm-1, however, are characteristic of semiconductors. Below the transition temperature, the TCR for the size-monodisperse nanocrystal arrays becomes negative, characteristic of an insulator and the conductance G, of the ordered arrays scales exponentially with temperature as G ∞ exp[-(To/T)ν]. The exponent ν, ranges from 0.67 to 1.34 for nanocrystals 77 Å to 35 Å in diameter, respectively, characteristic of a gap in the density of states in the overall electronic structure of the superlattice. We believe that electron transport occurs through a polaron hopping mechanism. In contrast to the organized superlattices, disordered close-packed nanocrystals exhibit insulating behavior at all temperatures studied due to (Anderson-type) disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8291-8296
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume105
Issue number35
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 6 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Superlattices
Silver
Nanocrystals
superlattices
nanocrystals
silver
electrons
Temperature
temperature
Coulomb blockade
Positive temperature coefficient
Gene Conversion
electrical resistivity
Superconducting transition temperature
coefficients
Electronic structure
Electron Transport
Metals
Particle size
Semiconductor materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Temperature-dependent electron transport through silver nanocrystal superlattices. / Christopher Doty, R.; Yu, Hongbin; Shih, C. Ken; Korgel, Brian A.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 105, No. 35, 06.09.2001, p. 8291-8296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Christopher Doty, R. ; Yu, Hongbin ; Shih, C. Ken ; Korgel, Brian A. / Temperature-dependent electron transport through silver nanocrystal superlattices. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 2001 ; Vol. 105, No. 35. pp. 8291-8296.
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