Telehealth in the trenches: Reporting back from the frontlines in rural America

Dale C. Alverson, Suzanne Shannon, Eileen Sullivan, Amanda Prill, Glen Effertz, Deborah Helitzer, Steven Beffort, Alistair Preston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Access to appropriate healthcare services continues to be a major challenge in rural America. Telehealth technologies offer an opportunity to bridge gaps in health services in rural and remote areas and possibly support rural economic development. Lack of access to healthcare services to a growing population may create barriers to recruitment of businesses and economic growth. Several rural-oriented programs have attempted to leverage these emerging distance technologies, but success has varied despite the application of considerable federal, state governmental, and private resources. Barriers to adoption and sustainability of rural telehealth embody several factors that must be considered when planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating a rural telehealth program. New Mexico, the fifth largest state in the United States, represents many of the issues related to the potential benefits and challenges in developing a telehealth system to serve its rural communities. The Center for Telehealth at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center has been supported in large part by state and federal funding. Through our experiences, successes, failures, and lessons learned, we have developed approaches to overcoming barriers to adoption and sustainment of telehealth applications, including the establishment of partnerships with economic development projects in the state. This article describes these experiences and identifies and provides strategies for planning, development, implementation, and sustainment of telehealth in a rural program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTelemedicine Journal and e-Health
Volume10
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
StatePublished - Dec 13 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Telemedicine
Economic Development
Economics
Rural Health Services
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Social Planning
Health
Planning
Rural Population
Sustainable development
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Bioengineering
  • Media Technology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Alverson, D. C., Shannon, S., Sullivan, E., Prill, A., Effertz, G., Helitzer, D., ... Preston, A. (2004). Telehealth in the trenches: Reporting back from the frontlines in rural America. Telemedicine Journal and e-Health, 10(SUPPL. 2).

Telehealth in the trenches : Reporting back from the frontlines in rural America. / Alverson, Dale C.; Shannon, Suzanne; Sullivan, Eileen; Prill, Amanda; Effertz, Glen; Helitzer, Deborah; Beffort, Steven; Preston, Alistair.

In: Telemedicine Journal and e-Health, Vol. 10, No. SUPPL. 2, 13.12.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alverson, DC, Shannon, S, Sullivan, E, Prill, A, Effertz, G, Helitzer, D, Beffort, S & Preston, A 2004, 'Telehealth in the trenches: Reporting back from the frontlines in rural America', Telemedicine Journal and e-Health, vol. 10, no. SUPPL. 2.
Alverson DC, Shannon S, Sullivan E, Prill A, Effertz G, Helitzer D et al. Telehealth in the trenches: Reporting back from the frontlines in rural America. Telemedicine Journal and e-Health. 2004 Dec 13;10(SUPPL. 2).
Alverson, Dale C. ; Shannon, Suzanne ; Sullivan, Eileen ; Prill, Amanda ; Effertz, Glen ; Helitzer, Deborah ; Beffort, Steven ; Preston, Alistair. / Telehealth in the trenches : Reporting back from the frontlines in rural America. In: Telemedicine Journal and e-Health. 2004 ; Vol. 10, No. SUPPL. 2.
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