Technologies of differences: Reading the virtual age through sexual (in)difference

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, I use disparate parts of Luce Irigaray's philosophical, psychological, and metaphorical writings about man's desire to control woman, the Other. In our current system of sexual (in)difference, men use technology in two distinct ways: to distance themselves from their bodies and to consume technology, making their bodies one with technology. The article pieces together a poststructuralist vision of technology by looking at the desire to control the Other and at the desire to control technology-man's desire to control technology and/or woman. By examining representations of technology through Irigarian lenses, the article concludes that the sexual revolution has not even begun, much less been completed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-167
Number of pages17
JournalComputers and Composition
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2003

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Sexual
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Psychological
Revolution

Keywords

  • Sexual (in)difference
  • The Other
  • Virtual age

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Technologies of differences : Reading the virtual age through sexual (in)difference. / Boyd, Patricia.

In: Computers and Composition, Vol. 20, No. 2, 06.2003, p. 151-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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