Technique for Nano-Machining High Aspect Ratio Structures

John Spence (Inventor)

Research output: Patent

Abstract

Part of an IIA led by Berkeley Lab:Wenbing Yun and colleagues have invented a nanomachining technique that will produce high aspect ratio, precision structures with feature sizes as small as 20 nm and aspect ratios potentially as high as several thousand. These capabilities are far beyond those obtainable using current, state-of-the-art microfabrication techniques, including electron-beam lithography, x-ray lithography, and lithographie galvanoformung abformung (LIGA). Berkeley Lab's new nanomachining technique allows fabrication of structures from a wide range of materials, such as inorganic insulators and plastic, that cannot be used in conventional processes. Metal structures may be formed in a second electroforming step. This new technique may be used to fabricate devices with many novel optical, mechanical, and electrical properties. Applications may be found in areas such as: micromachining of sensors; detectors and actuators; quantum devices; heat sinks; high aspect ratio lithography; medical implants, surgical devices and sensors; nondestructive microcircuit inspection; and packaging and integration of miniaturized components.
Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - May 8 2000

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high aspect ratio
machining
lithography
electroforming
sensors
heat sinks
micromachining
packaging
microelectronics
aspect ratio
inspection
plastics
actuators
electrical properties
insulators
mechanical properties
electron beams
optical properties
fabrication
detectors

Cite this

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title = "Technique for Nano-Machining High Aspect Ratio Structures",
abstract = "Part of an IIA led by Berkeley Lab:Wenbing Yun and colleagues have invented a nanomachining technique that will produce high aspect ratio, precision structures with feature sizes as small as 20 nm and aspect ratios potentially as high as several thousand. These capabilities are far beyond those obtainable using current, state-of-the-art microfabrication techniques, including electron-beam lithography, x-ray lithography, and lithographie galvanoformung abformung (LIGA). Berkeley Lab's new nanomachining technique allows fabrication of structures from a wide range of materials, such as inorganic insulators and plastic, that cannot be used in conventional processes. Metal structures may be formed in a second electroforming step. This new technique may be used to fabricate devices with many novel optical, mechanical, and electrical properties. Applications may be found in areas such as: micromachining of sensors; detectors and actuators; quantum devices; heat sinks; high aspect ratio lithography; medical implants, surgical devices and sensors; nondestructive microcircuit inspection; and packaging and integration of miniaturized components.",
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N2 - Part of an IIA led by Berkeley Lab:Wenbing Yun and colleagues have invented a nanomachining technique that will produce high aspect ratio, precision structures with feature sizes as small as 20 nm and aspect ratios potentially as high as several thousand. These capabilities are far beyond those obtainable using current, state-of-the-art microfabrication techniques, including electron-beam lithography, x-ray lithography, and lithographie galvanoformung abformung (LIGA). Berkeley Lab's new nanomachining technique allows fabrication of structures from a wide range of materials, such as inorganic insulators and plastic, that cannot be used in conventional processes. Metal structures may be formed in a second electroforming step. This new technique may be used to fabricate devices with many novel optical, mechanical, and electrical properties. Applications may be found in areas such as: micromachining of sensors; detectors and actuators; quantum devices; heat sinks; high aspect ratio lithography; medical implants, surgical devices and sensors; nondestructive microcircuit inspection; and packaging and integration of miniaturized components.

AB - Part of an IIA led by Berkeley Lab:Wenbing Yun and colleagues have invented a nanomachining technique that will produce high aspect ratio, precision structures with feature sizes as small as 20 nm and aspect ratios potentially as high as several thousand. These capabilities are far beyond those obtainable using current, state-of-the-art microfabrication techniques, including electron-beam lithography, x-ray lithography, and lithographie galvanoformung abformung (LIGA). Berkeley Lab's new nanomachining technique allows fabrication of structures from a wide range of materials, such as inorganic insulators and plastic, that cannot be used in conventional processes. Metal structures may be formed in a second electroforming step. This new technique may be used to fabricate devices with many novel optical, mechanical, and electrical properties. Applications may be found in areas such as: micromachining of sensors; detectors and actuators; quantum devices; heat sinks; high aspect ratio lithography; medical implants, surgical devices and sensors; nondestructive microcircuit inspection; and packaging and integration of miniaturized components.

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