Team adaptation and postchange performance: Effects of team composition in terms of members' cognitive ability and personality

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

262 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study extended research on relationships between individual differences and individual-level adaptation (J. A. LePine, J. A. Colquitt, & A. Erez, 2000). This study focused on team-level relationships (N = 73 teams) and demonstrated that after an unforeseen change in the task context, performance was superior for teams with members who had higher cognitive ability, achievement, and openness and who had lower dependability. These relationships were mediated by a measure of role structure adaptation (i.e., the effectiveness with which teams adapted their role structure when faced with an unforeseen change in their task context). Members' individual differences did not explain variance in team performance prior to the unforeseen change in the task context. Overall, results suggest differential relationships for team composition across routine and changing task contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-39
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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