Teaching young students strategies for planning and drafting stories: The impact of self-regulated strategy development

Brenda Tracy, Robert Reid, Steve Graham

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the present study, participants were 127 3rd-grade students, to 64 of whom (33 boys, 31 girls) the authors taught a general strategy and a genre-specific strategy for planning and writing stories; procedures for regulating the use of these strategies, the writing process, and their writing behaviors; and knowledge about the basic purpose and characteristics of good stories. The other 63 3rd-grade students (30 boys, 33 girls) formed the comparison group and received traditional-skills writing instruction (mostly on spelling, grammar, and so forth). Strategy-instructed students wrote stories that were longer, schematically stronger, and qualitatively better. Strategy-instructed students maintained over a short period of time the gains that they had made from pretest to posttest. In addition, the impact of story-writing strategy instruction transferred to writing a similar but untaught genre, that of a narrative about a personal experience. Strategyinstructed students wrote longer, schematically stronger, and qualitatively better personal narratives than did children in the control condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationA Cross Section of Educational Research
Subtitle of host publicationJournal Articles for Discussion and Evaluation
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages61-70
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781351971850
ISBN (Print)9781884585982
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 13 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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