Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities to Mindfully Plan When Writing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 38 Citations

Abstract

In this study, fifth-grade students with learning disabilities received instruction designed to help them incorporate three common planning strategies into their current approach to writing. Students learned to set goals, brainstorm ideas, and sequence their ideas while writing stories and completing self-selected homework assignments. To facilitate maintenance and generalization, instruction included a variety of procedures for inducing the thoughtful or mindful application of the planning strategies. Following instruction, planning became a prominent part of the composing process, as students spent as much time planning papers as writing them. Correspondingly, the schematic structure of students' stories improved and their papers became longer. These effects generalized to a second, uninstructed genre, persuasive essay writing, and were generally maintained over time.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages235-252
Number of pages18
JournalExceptional Children
Volume65
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Learning Disorders
learning disability
Teaching
Students
planning conception
instruction
student
time planning
homework
genre
Maintenance
planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities to Mindfully Plan When Writing. / Troia, Gary A.; Graham, Stephen; Harris, Karen.

In: Exceptional Children, Vol. 65, No. 2, 1999, p. 235-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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