Teaching spelling and composition alone and together

Implications for the simple view of writing

Virginia W. Berninger, Katherine Vaughan, Robert D. Abbott, Kristin Begay, Kristina Byrd Coleman, Gerald Curtin, Jill Minich Hawkins, Stephen Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Third graders with low compositional fluency (N = 96) were randomly assigned to 4 time-equated treatments in an instructional experiment (24 lessons over 4 months): spelling (alphabetic principle plus its alternations), composing (reflective discussion plus teacher scaffolding), combined spelling (alphabetic principle) plus composing (teacher scaffolding), and treated control (writing practice, no instruction). All treatments increased compositional fluency. Spelling and combined spelling plus composing were most effective for word-specific spelling (taught words). Teaching alternations improved phonological decoding and transferred to spelling in composing. Composing and combined spelling plus composing were most effective for persuasive essay writing. Only combined spelling plus composing increased both spelling and composing. Results are related to the simple view of writing that integrates diverse theoretical traditions and instructional practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-304
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume94
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Teaching spelling and composition alone and together : Implications for the simple view of writing. / Berninger, Virginia W.; Vaughan, Katherine; Abbott, Robert D.; Begay, Kristin; Coleman, Kristina Byrd; Curtin, Gerald; Hawkins, Jill Minich; Graham, Stephen.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 94, No. 2, 2002, p. 291-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berninger, VW, Vaughan, K, Abbott, RD, Begay, K, Coleman, KB, Curtin, G, Hawkins, JM & Graham, S 2002, 'Teaching spelling and composition alone and together: Implications for the simple view of writing', Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 94, no. 2, pp. 291-304. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0663.94.2.291
Berninger, Virginia W. ; Vaughan, Katherine ; Abbott, Robert D. ; Begay, Kristin ; Coleman, Kristina Byrd ; Curtin, Gerald ; Hawkins, Jill Minich ; Graham, Stephen. / Teaching spelling and composition alone and together : Implications for the simple view of writing. In: Journal of Educational Psychology. 2002 ; Vol. 94, No. 2. pp. 291-304.
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