Teaching random assignment: A classroom demonstration using a deck of playing cards

Craig K. Enders, Rick Stuetzle, Jean Philippe Laurenceau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite its apparent simplicity, random assignment is an abstract concept for many students. This article describes a classroom demonstration that uses a standard deck of playing cards. In small groups, students randomly assign playing cards (i.e., participants) to 2 treatment groups. Following randomization, students compare the relative frequency of "background variables" across the 2 groups (e.g., the number of red, black, face cards, spades). A pretest-posttest design indicated that quiz scores increased following the demonstration. We suggest a number of possible extensions for the demonstration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-242
Number of pages4
JournalTeaching of Psychology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

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Teaching
Students
classroom
student
quiz
Random Allocation
small group
Group
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Teaching random assignment : A classroom demonstration using a deck of playing cards. / Enders, Craig K.; Stuetzle, Rick; Laurenceau, Jean Philippe.

In: Teaching of Psychology, Vol. 33, No. 4, 09.2006, p. 239-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Enders, Craig K. ; Stuetzle, Rick ; Laurenceau, Jean Philippe. / Teaching random assignment : A classroom demonstration using a deck of playing cards. In: Teaching of Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 239-242.
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