Teaching english as an international language: Implications for literature courses in teacher preparation programs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Its spread through migration, colonization, and globalization has made English an-or arguably the-international language and, consequently, one of the most popular languages taught across the world. Yet classrooms where English is taught as a foreign language as well as in second-language teacher education have not kept pace with its growing complexity, namely the increased diversity in the language’s varieties, its users, and their purposes. This chapter problematizes this disconnect and argues that the inclusion of works beyond Anglo-America in literature courses for preservice language teachers is critical for addressing this gap. The chapter begins by introducing the notion of teaching English as an international language, a new development in the field of English-language teaching (ELT) that embraces the complicated reality of the English language today. It then explores how a more inclusive selection of literature can introduce and reinforce the perspective of English as an international language and raise teachers’ critical awareness of linguistic diversity and the cultural complexity of the language.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnglophone Literature in Second-Language Teacher Education
Subtitle of host publicationCurriculum Innovation through Intercultural Communication
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages24-36
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781000362909
ISBN (Print)9780367256524
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 16 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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