Teachers' views and beliefs about bullying: Influences on classroom management strategies and students' coping with peer victimization

Becky Ladd, Marie E. Pelletier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

186 Scopus citations

Abstract

A multilevel design was used to test a model in which teachers' attitudes (beliefs) about bullying (e.g., it is normative; assertive children do not get bullied; children wouldn't be bullied if they avoided mean kids) were hypothesized to influence if and how they intervene in bullying interactions. In turn, it was hypothesized that teachers' strategies would influence how their students cope with victimization and the frequency of victimization reported by their students. Data were gathered on 34 2nd and 4th grade teachers and 363 ethnically-diverse students (188 boys; 175 girls; M age = 9 years 2 months). Results indicated that teachers were not likely to intervene if they viewed bullying as normative behavior, but were more likely to intervene if they held either assertion or avoidant beliefs. Moreover, avoidant beliefs were predictive of separating students which was then associated both directly and indirectly (via reduced revenge seeking) with lower levels of peer victimization. No grade differences emerged for teachers' views or management strategies; however, minor sex differences were detected which will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-453
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of School Psychology
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

Keywords

  • Bullying
  • Classroom management
  • Coping
  • Peer victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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