Teachers’ Victimization-Related Beliefs and Strategies: Associations with Students’ Aggressive Behavior and Peer Victimization

Wendy Troop-Gordon, Gary Ladd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although teachers are often called upon to reduce children’s bullying and aggression, little is known regarding teachers’ responses to students’ harassment of peers or the beliefs which may inform their response strategies. To address this limitation, data were collected from 170 6th- and 7th-grade teachers (33 men; 137 women) and 2,938 (1,413 girls; 1,525 boys) of their students. Teachers beliefs regarding peer victimization were predictive of their efforts to advice victims how to cope with peer harassment. In particular, teachers who held more normative views of peer victimization were less likely to report reprimanding aggressive students and were more likely to utilize passive response strategies. Specific links emerged between teachers’ beliefs and strategies and classroom-levels of aggression and peer victimization in the fall and in the spring, as well as changes in students’ aggressive behavior and victimization over the course of the school year. Implications for intervention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-60
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Peer victimization
  • Teacher beliefs
  • Teacher strategies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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