Teacher Narratives and Student Engagement: Testing Narrative Engagement Theory in Drug Prevention Education

Michelle Miller-Day, Michael L. Hecht, Janice L. Krieger, Jonathan Pettigrew, YoungJu Shin, John Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Testing narrative engagement theory, this study examines student engagement and teachers’ spontaneous narratives told in a narrative-based drug prevention curriculum. The study describes the extent to which teachers share their own narratives in a narrative-based curriculum, identifies dominant narrative elements, forms and functions, and assesses the relationships among teacher narratives, overall lesson narrative quality, and student engagement. One-hundred videotaped lessons of the keepin’ it REAL drug prevention curriculum were coded and the results supported the claim that increased narrative quality of a prevention lesson would be associated with increased student engagement. The quality of narrativity, however, varied widely. Implications of these results for narrative-based prevention interventions and narrative pedagogy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)604-620
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Language and Social Psychology
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • health campaign
  • narrative
  • pedagogy
  • prevention science
  • substance use prevention
  • teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Linguistics and Language
  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Language and Linguistics

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