Swift observations of the March 2011 outburst of the cataclysmic variable NSV 1436: A probable dwarf nova

J. P. Osborne, K. L. Page, A. A. Henden, J. U. Ness, M. F. Bode, G. J. Schwarz, Sumner Starrfield, J. J. Drake, E. Kuulkers, A. P. Beardmore

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Abstract

Aims. The March 2011 outburst of the poorly-studied cataclysmic variable NSV 1436 offered an opportunity to decide between dwarf nova and recurrent nova classifications. Methods. We use seven daily observations in the X-ray and UV by the Swift satellite, together with AAVSO V photometry, to characterise the outburst and decline behaviour. Results. The short optical outburst coincided with a faint and relatively soft X-ray state, whereas in decline to fainter optical magnitudes the X-ray source was harder and brighter. These attributes, and the modest optical outburst amplitude, indicate that this was a dwarf nova outburst and not a recurrent nova. The rapid optical fading suggests an orbital period below 2 h.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberA41
JournalAstronomy and Astrophysics
Volume533
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2011

Keywords

  • Accretion, accretion disks
  • Binaries: general
  • Novae, cataclysmic variables
  • Stars: dwarf novae
  • Stars: individual: NSV 1436

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

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    Osborne, J. P., Page, K. L., Henden, A. A., Ness, J. U., Bode, M. F., Schwarz, G. J., Starrfield, S., Drake, J. J., Kuulkers, E., & Beardmore, A. P. (2011). Swift observations of the March 2011 outburst of the cataclysmic variable NSV 1436: A probable dwarf nova. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 533, [A41]. https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201117088