Susceptibility of the endangered California tiger salamander, Ambystoma californiense, to ranavirus infection

Angela M. Picco, Jesse L. Brunner, James Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emerging infectious diseases are implicated in the declines and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. Ranaviruses in the family Iridoviridae are a global concern and have caused amphibian die-offs in wild populations in North America, Europe, South America, and in commercial populations in Asia and South America. The movement of amphibians for bait, food, pets, and research provides a route for the introduction of ranaviruses into naive and potentially endangered species. In this report, we demonstrate that the California tiger salamander, Ambystoma californiense, is susceptible to Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV). This virus has not been previously reported in California tiger salamander, but observed mortality in experimentally infected animals suggests that California tiger salamander populations could be adversely affected by an ATV introduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-290
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Wildlife Diseases
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Keywords

  • Ambystoma californiense
  • Ambystoma tigrinum virus
  • Ranaviruses
  • Tiger salamander

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

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