Supportive parenting moderates the effect of discrimination upon anger, hostile view of relationships, and violence among African American boys

Ronald L. Simons, Leslie Gordon Simons, Callie Harbin Burt, Holli Drummund, Eric Stewart, Gene H. Brody, Frederick X. Gibbons, Carolyn Cutrona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

142 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies have shown that exposure to discrimination increases the probability that African American adolescents will engage in delinquent behavior, especially acts of violence. The present study extended this research by examining the extent to which supportive parenting buffers a youth from these deleterious consequences of discrimination. Analyses based upon two waves of data from a sample of 332 African American adolescent males and their caretakers supported this hypothesis. Further, the results indicated that there are two avenues whereby supportive parenting reduces the probability that discrimination will lead to violence. First, supportive parenting decreases the chances that discrimination will lead to anger and a hostile view of relationships. Second, supportive parenting lowers the risk that anger or a hostile view of relationships, when they develop, will result in violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)373-389
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of health and social behavior
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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