SUICIDE AS MURDER AT COMMON LAW

Another Chapter in the Falsification of Consensus Theory

DENNIS E. HOFFMAN, Vincent Webb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The debate among advocates of consensus, pluralist. and Marxist views of the origins of criminal law continues to occupy a central position in contemporary theoretical criminology. This article assesses these positions through a historical inquiry into the law‐making and‐enforcing processes surrounding self‐murder or suicide. Historical data on the criminalization and depenalization of suicide indicate that economic and fiscal interests shaped suicide laws, but these laws were unenforceable because of popular resistance. The significance of these findings for criminological theory is that laws generally thought to be based on consensus were instead grounded in conflict and struggle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-384
Number of pages13
JournalCriminology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

falsification
Homicide
common law
Suicide
homicide
suicide
Consensus
Law
Criminology
Criminal Law
criminalization
criminology
criminal law
Economics
economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

SUICIDE AS MURDER AT COMMON LAW : Another Chapter in the Falsification of Consensus Theory. / HOFFMAN, DENNIS E.; Webb, Vincent.

In: Criminology, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.01.1981, p. 372-384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b2c4c572e786434faa69dd1649398e58,
title = "SUICIDE AS MURDER AT COMMON LAW: Another Chapter in the Falsification of Consensus Theory",
abstract = "The debate among advocates of consensus, pluralist. and Marxist views of the origins of criminal law continues to occupy a central position in contemporary theoretical criminology. This article assesses these positions through a historical inquiry into the law‐making and‐enforcing processes surrounding self‐murder or suicide. Historical data on the criminalization and depenalization of suicide indicate that economic and fiscal interests shaped suicide laws, but these laws were unenforceable because of popular resistance. The significance of these findings for criminological theory is that laws generally thought to be based on consensus were instead grounded in conflict and struggle.",
author = "HOFFMAN, {DENNIS E.} and Vincent Webb",
year = "1981",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1745-9125.1981.tb00423.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "372--384",
journal = "Criminology",
issn = "0011-1384",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - SUICIDE AS MURDER AT COMMON LAW

T2 - Another Chapter in the Falsification of Consensus Theory

AU - HOFFMAN, DENNIS E.

AU - Webb, Vincent

PY - 1981/1/1

Y1 - 1981/1/1

N2 - The debate among advocates of consensus, pluralist. and Marxist views of the origins of criminal law continues to occupy a central position in contemporary theoretical criminology. This article assesses these positions through a historical inquiry into the law‐making and‐enforcing processes surrounding self‐murder or suicide. Historical data on the criminalization and depenalization of suicide indicate that economic and fiscal interests shaped suicide laws, but these laws were unenforceable because of popular resistance. The significance of these findings for criminological theory is that laws generally thought to be based on consensus were instead grounded in conflict and struggle.

AB - The debate among advocates of consensus, pluralist. and Marxist views of the origins of criminal law continues to occupy a central position in contemporary theoretical criminology. This article assesses these positions through a historical inquiry into the law‐making and‐enforcing processes surrounding self‐murder or suicide. Historical data on the criminalization and depenalization of suicide indicate that economic and fiscal interests shaped suicide laws, but these laws were unenforceable because of popular resistance. The significance of these findings for criminological theory is that laws generally thought to be based on consensus were instead grounded in conflict and struggle.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0019842137&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0019842137&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1745-9125.1981.tb00423.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1745-9125.1981.tb00423.x

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 372

EP - 384

JO - Criminology

JF - Criminology

SN - 0011-1384

IS - 3

ER -