Sugar, perceived healthfulness, and satiety: When does a sugary preload lead people to eat more?

Naomi Mandel, Daniel Brannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this research, we examine the interplay between physiological and psychological factors that determine whether the sugar level of a preload increases or decreases consumption on a subsequent snack-eating task. In study 1, participants who drank a high-sugar protein shake (which they believed to be healthy) consumed more subsequent snacks than participants who drank a low-sugar protein shake. Study 2 replicated these findings, but only when the shake was labeled as “healthy.” When the shake was labeled as “indulgent,” the effect was mitigated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)338-349
Number of pages12
JournalAppetite
Volume114
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • Compensation
  • Labeling
  • Preload
  • Satiety
  • Sugar

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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