Successful Resolutions to the Career‐Versus‐Family Conflict

Richard Kinnier, MARTHA A. BERRY

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One hundred and twenty husbands and wives (60 couples) were individually assessed on how conflicted (or resolved) they were about the career‐versus‐family conflict in their lives. Their written resolutions were also content‐analyzed to extract specific themes and conflict‐resolution strategies. Data on participants' self‐esteem, conflict‐related anxiety, life satisfaction, and demographic variables were also collected. Results of t tests, chi‐squares, Pearson correlations, and a stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that high self‐esteem and life satisfaction best predicted being resolved about the conflict. The only theme that discriminated between the most and least resolved spouses was “my family comes first” (held by the most resolved). Wives were more rationally resolved about the conflict than their husbands. 1991 American Counseling Association

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-444
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Counseling & Development
Volume69
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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Spouses
Counseling
Anxiety
Regression Analysis
Demography
Conflict (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Successful Resolutions to the Career‐Versus‐Family Conflict. / Kinnier, Richard; BERRY, MARTHA A.

In: Journal of Counseling & Development, Vol. 69, No. 5, 1991, p. 439-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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