Subpopulation-specific differences in skeletal muscle mitochondria in humans with obesity: Insights from studies employing acute nutritional and exercise stimuli

Nisreen Wahwah, Katon A. Kras, Lori R. Roust, Christos S. Katsanos

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Mitochondria from skeletal muscle of humans with obesity often display alterations with respect to their morphology, proteome, biogenesis, and function. These changes in muscle mitochondria are considered to contribute to metabolic abnormalities observed in humans with obesity. Most of the evidence describing alterations in muscle mitochondria in humans with obesity, however, lacks reference to a specific subcellular location. This is despite data over the years showing differences in the morphology and function of subsarcolemmal (found near the plasma membrane) and intermyofibrillar (nested between the myofibrils) mitochondria in skeletal muscle. Recent studies reveal that impairments in mitochondrial function in obesity with respect to the subcellular location of the mitochondria in muscle are more readily evident following exposure of the skeletal muscle to physiological stimuli. In this review, we highlight the need to understand skeletal muscle mitochondria metabolism in obesity in a subpopulation-specific manner and in the presence of physiological stimuli that modify mitochondrial function in vivo. Experimental approaches employed under these conditions will allow for more precise characterization of impairments in skeletal muscle mitochondria and their implications in inducing metabolic dysfunction in human obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E538-E553
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume318
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Intermyofibrillar
  • Mitochondria
  • Nutrition
  • Subsarcolemmal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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