Stunting professionalism: The potency and durability of the hidden curriculum within medical education

Barret Michaleca, Frederic W. Hafferty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite an extensive literature within medical education touting the necessity in developing professionalism among future physicians, there is little evidence these 'calls' have thus far had an appreciable effect. Although various researchers have suggested that the hidden curriculum within medical education has a prominent role in stunting the development of professionalism among future physicians, there has been minimal discussion of how the content of the hidden curriculum actually function to this end. In this article, we explore: (i) how the hidden curriculum may function within medical education as a countervailing force to medicine's push for professionalism and (ii) why the hidden curriculum continues to persist within medical training and particular aspects so difficult to dilute. We conclude by proposing mechanisms to assuage elements of the hidden curriculum, which may, in turn, allow the principles of professionalism to blossom among medical students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)388-406
Number of pages19
JournalSocial Theory and Health
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Keywords

  • Hidden curriculum
  • Medical education
  • Professionalism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Stunting professionalism: The potency and durability of the hidden curriculum within medical education'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this