Studies of inactivation of encephalomyocarditis virus, M13 bacteriophage, and Salmonella typhimurium by using a visible femtosecond laser

Insight into the possible inactivation mechanisms

Kong-Thon Tsen, Shaw Wei D Tsen, Qiang Fu, Stuart Lindsay, Zhe Li, Stephanie Cope, Sara Vaiana, Juliann G. Kiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report experimental results on the inactivation of encephalomyocarditis virus, M13 bacteriophage, and Salmonella typhimurium by a visible femtosecond laser. Our results suggest that inactivation of virus and bacterium by a visible femtosecond laser involves completely different mechanisms. Inactivation of viruses by a visible femtosecond laser involves the breaking of hydrogen/hydrophobic bonds or the separation of the weak protein links in the protein shell of a viral particle. In contrast, inactivation of bacteria is related to the damage of their DNAs due to irradiation of a visible femtosecond laser. Possible mechanisms for the inactivation of viruses and bacteria are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number078003
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

Fingerprint

salmonella
bacteriophages
Bacteriophages
Salmonella
viruses
Ultrashort pulses
deactivation
Viruses
Bacteria
bacteria
lasers
Proteins
proteins
Hydrogen
DNA
Irradiation
deoxyribonucleic acid
hydrogen bonds
damage
irradiation

Keywords

  • Bacteria
  • Femtosecond lasers
  • Inactivation of viruses
  • Irradiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

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title = "Studies of inactivation of encephalomyocarditis virus, M13 bacteriophage, and Salmonella typhimurium by using a visible femtosecond laser: Insight into the possible inactivation mechanisms",
abstract = "We report experimental results on the inactivation of encephalomyocarditis virus, M13 bacteriophage, and Salmonella typhimurium by a visible femtosecond laser. Our results suggest that inactivation of virus and bacterium by a visible femtosecond laser involves completely different mechanisms. Inactivation of viruses by a visible femtosecond laser involves the breaking of hydrogen/hydrophobic bonds or the separation of the weak protein links in the protein shell of a viral particle. In contrast, inactivation of bacteria is related to the damage of their DNAs due to irradiation of a visible femtosecond laser. Possible mechanisms for the inactivation of viruses and bacteria are discussed.",
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AU - Tsen, Kong-Thon

AU - Tsen, Shaw Wei D

AU - Fu, Qiang

AU - Lindsay, Stuart

AU - Li, Zhe

AU - Cope, Stephanie

AU - Vaiana, Sara

AU - Kiang, Juliann G.

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AB - We report experimental results on the inactivation of encephalomyocarditis virus, M13 bacteriophage, and Salmonella typhimurium by a visible femtosecond laser. Our results suggest that inactivation of virus and bacterium by a visible femtosecond laser involves completely different mechanisms. Inactivation of viruses by a visible femtosecond laser involves the breaking of hydrogen/hydrophobic bonds or the separation of the weak protein links in the protein shell of a viral particle. In contrast, inactivation of bacteria is related to the damage of their DNAs due to irradiation of a visible femtosecond laser. Possible mechanisms for the inactivation of viruses and bacteria are discussed.

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