Studies in the synthesis of control structures for chemical processes: Part I: Formulation of the problem. Process decomposition and the classification of the control tasks. Analysis of the optimizing control structures

Manfred Morari, Yaman Arkun, George Stephanopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

203 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Part I of this series presents a unified formulation of the problem of synthesizing control structures for chemical processes. The formulation is rigorous and free of engineering heuristics, providing the framework for generalizations and further analytical developments on this important problem. Decomposition is the underlying, guiding principle, leading to the classification of the control objectives (regulation, optimization) and the partitioning of the process for the practical implementation of the control structures. Within the framework of hierarchical control and multi‐level optimization theory, mathematical measures have been developed to guide the decomposition of the control tasks and the partitioning of the process. Consequently, the extent and the purpose of the regulatory and optimizing control objectives for a given plant are well defined, and alternative control structures can be generated for the designer's analysis and screening. In addition, in this first part we examine the features of various optimizing control strategies (feedforward, feedback; centralized, decentralized) and develop methods for their generation and selective screening. Application of all these principles is illustrated on an integrated chemical plant that offers enough variety and complexity to allow conclusions about a real‐life situation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-232
Number of pages13
JournalAICHE Journal
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

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Chemical Phenomena
Research Design
Decomposition
Screening
Feedforward control
Chemical plants
Feedback

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

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