Studies in aging of the brain

IV. Farnilial Ahher disease: Relation to transmissible dementia, aneuploidy, and microtubular defects

Robert Cook-Deegan, Brian E. Ward, James H. Austin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alzheimer disease was transmitted in a pattern consistent with an autosomal dominant trait in three families. This brings to 50 the number of such families reported. In one of our families, one patient had histologically confirmed Alzheimer disease, whereas her sister had proved spongiform encephalopathy. Other data suggest a link between familial Alzheimer disease and transmissible dementia. Alzheimer disease is associated with abnormal neurofibrillary structures, Down syndrome, and abnormal numbers of chromosomes in lymphocytes (aneuploidy). These observations are consistent with a disorder in the physiology of tubular-filamentous structures involving different cell types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1402-1412
Number of pages11
JournalNeurology
Volume29
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1979
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prion Diseases
Aneuploidy
Alzheimer Disease
Brain
Brain Diseases
Down Syndrome
Siblings
Chromosomes
Dementia
Defects
Alzheimer's Disease
Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Studies in aging of the brain : IV. Farnilial Ahher disease: Relation to transmissible dementia, aneuploidy, and microtubular defects. / Cook-Deegan, Robert; Ward, Brian E.; Austin, James H.

In: Neurology, Vol. 29, No. 10, 1979, p. 1402-1412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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