Estructura de la fauna de escarabajos (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) en relictos de selva en el occidente de Puerto Rico

Translated title of the contribution: Structure of the scarab beetle fauna (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) in forest remnants of western Puerto Rico

Neis J. Martínez, Nico M. Franz, Jaime A. Acosta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied the richness and abundance of scarab beetle species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) in two successional forest fragments located on the campus of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (UPRM), western Puerto Rico. The sampling period extended from April to December, 2005, and included nine monthly repetitions of quantitative captures using necrophilous, pitfall, and light traps. A total of 2399 individuals pertaining to 14 species, or 36% of the Island's total scarab diversity were caught. The spatial variation in diversity and abundance was low among sites. However, there was a significant shift in community structure between the drier season (April to June) and rainy season (September to December). The following four species constituted 92% of all captured individuals: Canthochilum andyi Chapin, C. borinquiensis Matthews, C. taino Matthews, and Phyllophaga vandinei Smyth. The results underscore the important role that western Puerto Rican forest fragments play in maintaining regional scarab beetle communities, and provide a baseline for developing ecological assessment tools for these habitats.

Translated title of the contributionStructure of the scarab beetle fauna (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) in forest remnants of western Puerto Rico
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalEntomotropica
Volume24
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Quantitative sampling
  • Succession
  • Urban forest

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

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