Structure and dynamics of earth's lower mantle

Edward Garnero, Allen K. McNamara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

248 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Processes within the lowest several hundred kilometers of Earth's rocky mantle play a critical role in the evolution of the planet. Understanding Earth's lower mantle requires putting recent seismic and mineral physics discoveries into a self-consistent, geodynamically feasible context. Two nearly antipodal large low-shear-velocity provinces in the deep mantle likely represent chemically distinct and denser material. High-resolution seismological studies have revealed laterally varying seismic velocity discontinuities in the deepest few hundred kilometers, consistent with a phase transition from perovskite to post-perovskite. In the deepest tens of kilometers of the mantle, isolated pockets of ultralow seismic velocities may denote Earth's deepest magma chamber.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)626-628
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume320
Issue number5876
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2008

Fingerprint

Planets
Phase Transition
Physics
Minerals
perovskite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Structure and dynamics of earth's lower mantle. / Garnero, Edward; McNamara, Allen K.

In: Science, Vol. 320, No. 5876, 02.05.2008, p. 626-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garnero, Edward ; McNamara, Allen K. / Structure and dynamics of earth's lower mantle. In: Science. 2008 ; Vol. 320, No. 5876. pp. 626-628.
@article{0ad1402302e541158461c2ca249d10dc,
title = "Structure and dynamics of earth's lower mantle",
abstract = "Processes within the lowest several hundred kilometers of Earth's rocky mantle play a critical role in the evolution of the planet. Understanding Earth's lower mantle requires putting recent seismic and mineral physics discoveries into a self-consistent, geodynamically feasible context. Two nearly antipodal large low-shear-velocity provinces in the deep mantle likely represent chemically distinct and denser material. High-resolution seismological studies have revealed laterally varying seismic velocity discontinuities in the deepest few hundred kilometers, consistent with a phase transition from perovskite to post-perovskite. In the deepest tens of kilometers of the mantle, isolated pockets of ultralow seismic velocities may denote Earth's deepest magma chamber.",
author = "Edward Garnero and McNamara, {Allen K.}",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1126/science.1148028",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "320",
pages = "626--628",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "5876",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Structure and dynamics of earth's lower mantle

AU - Garnero, Edward

AU - McNamara, Allen K.

PY - 2008/5/2

Y1 - 2008/5/2

N2 - Processes within the lowest several hundred kilometers of Earth's rocky mantle play a critical role in the evolution of the planet. Understanding Earth's lower mantle requires putting recent seismic and mineral physics discoveries into a self-consistent, geodynamically feasible context. Two nearly antipodal large low-shear-velocity provinces in the deep mantle likely represent chemically distinct and denser material. High-resolution seismological studies have revealed laterally varying seismic velocity discontinuities in the deepest few hundred kilometers, consistent with a phase transition from perovskite to post-perovskite. In the deepest tens of kilometers of the mantle, isolated pockets of ultralow seismic velocities may denote Earth's deepest magma chamber.

AB - Processes within the lowest several hundred kilometers of Earth's rocky mantle play a critical role in the evolution of the planet. Understanding Earth's lower mantle requires putting recent seismic and mineral physics discoveries into a self-consistent, geodynamically feasible context. Two nearly antipodal large low-shear-velocity provinces in the deep mantle likely represent chemically distinct and denser material. High-resolution seismological studies have revealed laterally varying seismic velocity discontinuities in the deepest few hundred kilometers, consistent with a phase transition from perovskite to post-perovskite. In the deepest tens of kilometers of the mantle, isolated pockets of ultralow seismic velocities may denote Earth's deepest magma chamber.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=46449085037&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=46449085037&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.1148028

DO - 10.1126/science.1148028

M3 - Article

C2 - 18451293

AN - SCOPUS:46449085037

VL - 320

SP - 626

EP - 628

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 5876

ER -