Structural and genetic investigation of the egg and first-instar larva of an egg-laying population of Blaesoxipha plinthopyga (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), a species of forensic importance

Meaghan L. Pimsler, Thomas Pape, J. Spencer Johnston, Robert A. Wharton, Jonathan J. Parrott, Danielle Restuccia, Michelle R. Sanford, Jeffery K. Tomberlin, Aaron M. Tarone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Flies in the family Sarcophagidae incubate their eggs and areknownto be ovoviviparous (i.e., ovolarviparous), but a laboratory-maintained colony of Blaesoxipha plinthopyga (Wiedemann) deposited clutches of viable eggs over 10 generations. A description of the egg and first-instar larva of this species is provided along with genetic data (genome size and cytochrome oxidase I sequences). The egg is similar to previously described eggs of other Sarcophagidae but differs in the configuration of the micropyle. In the first-instar larva, the oral ridges are much more developed than has been described for other species. B. plinthopyga has forensic importance, and the present descriptive information is critical for proper case management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1283-1295
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Medical Entomology
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Flesh fly
  • Genome size
  • Morphology
  • Ovoviviparity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • veterinary(all)
  • Insect Science
  • Infectious Diseases

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