Stress reactivity to co-rumination in young women's friendships

Cortisol, alpha-amylase, and negative affect focus

Jennifer Byrd-Craven, Douglas A. Granger, Brandon J. Auer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Young women typically use same-sex friendships as a source of social support during times of stress. However, friendship interactions that are characterized by co-rumination, excessive problem discussion and negative affect focus, while related to quality friendships, are also related to internalizing symptoms. The goal of the current study was to better understand how the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (salivary cortisol) and sympathetic nervous system (salivary alpha-amylase, sAA), react to co-rumination. Observed co-rumination predicted increased cortisol responses while negative affect focus during problem discussion predicted increases in both cortisol and sAA. These findings suggest that dual system activation may be at least one physiological pattern that links co-rumination to increased internalizing symptoms, even in the context of a high-quality friendship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)469-487
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cortisol
Amylases
alpha-Amylases
friendship
Hydrocortisone
Salivary alpha-Amylases
Neurology
dual system
Sympathetic Nervous System
Chemical activation
Social Support
activation
social support
interaction

Keywords

  • Alpha-amylase
  • co-rumination
  • cortisol
  • friendships
  • peer relationships
  • psychosocial stress
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Stress reactivity to co-rumination in young women's friendships : Cortisol, alpha-amylase, and negative affect focus. / Byrd-Craven, Jennifer; Granger, Douglas A.; Auer, Brandon J.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 28, No. 4, 06.2011, p. 469-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Byrd-Craven, Jennifer ; Granger, Douglas A. ; Auer, Brandon J. / Stress reactivity to co-rumination in young women's friendships : Cortisol, alpha-amylase, and negative affect focus. In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 2011 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 469-487.
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