Strength training increases endurance time to exhaustion during high-intensity exercise despite no change in critical power

Brandon J. Sawyer, David G. Stokes, Christopher J. Womack, R. Hugh Morton, Arthur Weltman, Glenn Gaesser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sawyer, BJ, Stokes, DG, Womack, CJ, Morton, RH, Weltman, A, and Gaesser, GA. Strength training increases endurance time to exhaustion during high-intensity exercise despite no change in critical power. J Strength Cond Res 28(3): 601- 609, 2014-The purpose of this study was to determine whether improvements in endurance exercise performance elicited by strength training were accurately reflected by changes in parameters of the power-duration hyperbola for high-intensity exercise. Before and after 8 weeks of strength training (N = 14) or no exercise, control (N = 5), 19 males (age: 20.6 ± 2.0 years; weight: 78.2 ± 15.9 kg) performed a maximal incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer and also cycled to exhaustion during 4 constant-power exercise bouts. Critical power (CP) and anaerobic work capacity (Ẁ) were estimated using nonlinear and linear models. Subjects in the strength training group improved significantly more than controls (p < 0.05) for strength (∼ 30%), power at VO2 peak (7.9%), and time to exhaustion (TTE) for all 4 constant- power tests (∼39%). Contrary to our hypothesis, CP did not change significantly after strength training (p < 0.05 for all models). Strength training improvedW0 (mean range of improvement = +5.8 to +10.0 kJ; p < 0.05) for both linear models. Increases in Ẁ were consistently positively correlated with improvements in TTE, whereas changes in CP were not. Our findings indicate that strength training alters the power-duration hyperbola such that Ẁ is enhanced without any improvement in CP. Consequently, CP may not be robust enough to track changes in endurance capacity elicited by strength training, and we do not recommend it to be used for this purpose. Conversely, W0 may be the better indicator of improvement in endurance performance elicited by strength training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)601-609
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume28
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2014

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Resistance Training
Linear Models
Nonlinear Dynamics
Exercise Test
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Anaerobic work capacity
  • Resistance training
  • Severe-intensity exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Strength training increases endurance time to exhaustion during high-intensity exercise despite no change in critical power. / Sawyer, Brandon J.; Stokes, David G.; Womack, Christopher J.; Morton, R. Hugh; Weltman, Arthur; Gaesser, Glenn.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 28, No. 3, 2014, p. 601-609.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sawyer, Brandon J. ; Stokes, David G. ; Womack, Christopher J. ; Morton, R. Hugh ; Weltman, Arthur ; Gaesser, Glenn. / Strength training increases endurance time to exhaustion during high-intensity exercise despite no change in critical power. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2014 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 601-609.
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