Strategy Instruction in Planning: Effects on the Writing Performance and Behavior of Students with Learning Difficulties

Susan De La Paz, Stephen Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 44 Citations

Abstract

Students with learning difficulties typically approach writing by retrieving from memory whatever seems appropriate and writing it down. This retrieve-and-write process minimizes the role of reflection and planning in the composing process. In the current study, we taught three students with learning difficulties a strategy designed to help them become more reflective when writing opinion essays. Following instruction in the strategy, students wrote essays that were longer, provided more support for their premise, and were qualitatively better. Two of the students also changed their approach to writing, developing an initial plan prior to writing that they continued to elaborate and refine as they wrote. Changes in both writing performance and behavior were maintained over time.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages167-181
Number of pages15
JournalExceptional Children
Volume63
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1997
Externally publishedYes

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learning disorder
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planning
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Strategy Instruction in Planning : Effects on the Writing Performance and Behavior of Students with Learning Difficulties. / De La Paz, Susan; Graham, Stephen.

In: Exceptional Children, Vol. 63, No. 2, 12.1997, p. 167-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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