Strategies to resist drug offers among urban American Indian youth of the southwest: An enumeration, classification, and analysis by substance and offeror

Stephen Kulis, Leslie Jumper Reeves, Patricia Allen Dustman, Marissa O'Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores the drug resistance strategies of urban American Indian adolescents when they encounter people offering them alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana. Data were collected in 2005 from 11 female and 9 male adolescents who self-identified as American Indian and attended two urban middle schools in the southwestern United States. In two focus groupsâ€"one at each school siteâ€"the youth described their reactions to 25 hypothetical substance offer scenarios drawn from real-life narratives of similar youth. Qualitative analysis of their 552 responses to the scenarios generated 14 categories. Half of the responses were strategies reported most often by nonnative youth (refuse, explain, leave, and avoid). Using ecodevelopmental theory, the responses were analyzed for indications of culturally specific ways of resisting substance offers, such as variation by specific substance and relationship to the person offering. Study limitations are noted along with suggestive implications for future research on culturally appropriate prevention approaches for urban American Indian youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1395-1409
Number of pages15
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume46
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 29 2011

Keywords

  • Drug resistance strategies
  • Resiliency
  • Substance offers
  • Urban American Indian youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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