Strategies for Stabilizing DNA Nanostructures to Biological Conditions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

DNA is one of the most promising building blocks for creating functional nanostructures for applications in biology and medicine. However, these highly programmable nanomaterials (e.g., DNA origami) often require supraphysiological salt concentrations for stability, are degraded by nuclease enzymes, and can elicit an inflammatory response. Herein, three key strategies for stabilizing DNA nanostructures to conditions required for biological applications are outlined: 1) tuning the buffer conditions or nanostructure design; 2) covalently crosslinking the strands that make up the structures; and 3) coating the structures with polymers, proteins, or lipid bilayers. Taken together, these approaches greatly expand the chemical diversity and future applicability of DNA nanotechnology both in vitro and in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChemBioChem
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Nanostructures
DNA
Nanotechnology
Lipid bilayers
Lipid Bilayers
Nanostructured materials
Crosslinking
Medicine
Buffers
Polymers
Tuning
Salts
Coatings
Enzymes
Proteins

Keywords

  • biological activity
  • DNA
  • nanotechnology
  • polymers
  • self-assembly

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Strategies for Stabilizing DNA Nanostructures to Biological Conditions. / Stephanopoulos, Nicholas.

In: ChemBioChem, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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