Strategic finance, public authorities, and network politics

G. J. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A primary function of many public authorities is capital financing. Some argue the process is dominated by the public authority that issues the bonds. Others argue that the investment community control the process in an effort to advance their interests. An innovative perspective, to be explored in this paper, is that capital financing follows a network model in which the influence of interdependent actors is controlling and controlled. The first section describes major elements of capital financing. The second section discusses alternative theories of accountability in capital financing. The third and fourth sections explore various dimensions of network politics. The fifth section examines how networks have worked in practice for three public authorities. The final section identifies the implications of network politics for strategic finance. -from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)961-973
Number of pages13
JournalPolicy Studies Journal
Volume18
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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public authorities
finance
politics
accountability
responsibility
public finance
financing
community
public

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Strategic finance, public authorities, and network politics. / Miller, G. J.

In: Policy Studies Journal, Vol. 18, No. 4, 1990, p. 961-973.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, G. J. / Strategic finance, public authorities, and network politics. In: Policy Studies Journal. 1990 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 961-973.
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