Strain and electronic structure interactions in realistically-scaled quantum dot stacks

Muhammad Usman, Shaikh Ahmed, Marek Korkusinski, Clemens Heitzinger, Gerhard Klimeck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-assembled quantum dots (DQ) can be grown as stacks where the QD distance can be controlled with atomic layer control. This distance determines the interaction of the artificial atom states to form artificial molecules. The design of QD stacks becomes complicated since the structures are subject to inhomogeneous, long-range strain and growth imperfections such as non-identical dots and inter-diffused interfaces. This study presents simulations of stacks consistent of three QDs in their resulting inhomogeneous strain field. The simulations are performed with NEMO 3-D which uses the valence force field method to compute the strain and the empirical sp3ds * tight binding method to compute the electronic structure. Strain is shown to provide a very interesting mixing between states and preferred ordering of the ground state in the top-most or bottom most quantum dot subject to growth asymmetries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPhysics of Semiconductors - 28th International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors, ICPS 2006, Part A and B
Pages847-848
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event28th International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors, ICPS 2006 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: Jul 24 2006Jul 28 2006

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume893
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

Other28th International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors, ICPS 2006
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period7/24/067/28/06

Keywords

  • Atomistic VFF model
  • Hamiltonian
  • NEMO-3D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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