Stoichiometric impact of calcium carbonate deposition on nitrogen and phosphorus supplies in three montane streams

Jessica R. Corman, Eric K. Moody, James Elser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The absolute concentrations of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and their relative availabilities (N:P stoichiometry) can influence numerous ecological processes. In streams, N:P stoichiometry is influenced by different hydrologic and biogeochemical processes that also affect the downstream transport of these nutrients to receiving waters. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) deposition, a widespread geochemical process in alkaline streams and other aquatic ecosystems, can lower phosphate concentrations and, potentially, decrease P availability relative to N availability. We evaluated the effects of CaCO3 deposition on stream water stoichiometry using a 3-year dataset of stream physicochemistry and several metrics of CaCO3 deposition across three streams in the Huachuca Mountains of southern Arizona, USA. CaCO3 deposition rates varied across and within streams, with benthic coverage of travertine as high as 70 % and deposition rates up to 8.3 μg Ca2+ L−1 m−1. Redundancy analysis revealed a strong, negative correlation between stream water phosphate concentrations and CaCO3 deposition rates, a relationship that also extended to total P concentrations, and a strong, positive correlation between inorganic N concentrations and CaCO3 deposition rates. Furthermore, we found a significant positive relationship between CaCO3 deposition rates and N:P ratios. These results support the role of coprecipitation of phosphate with CaCO3 deposition in reducing P supply. They also suggest that reduced concentrations of P in the water column may reduce biological N uptake, amplifying the stoichiometric signal of CaCO3 deposition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-300
Number of pages16
JournalBiogeochemistry
Volume126
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

mountain stream
Calcium Carbonate
Deposition rates
calcium carbonate
Phosphorus
Nitrogen
phosphorus
Stoichiometry
nitrogen
Water
Phosphates
Availability
stoichiometry
Aquatic ecosystems
phosphate
Coprecipitation
Nutrients
Redundancy
travertine
aquatic ecosystem

Keywords

  • Calcium carbonate
  • Nutrient cycling
  • Redundancy analysis
  • Stoichiometry
  • Streams

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Stoichiometric impact of calcium carbonate deposition on nitrogen and phosphorus supplies in three montane streams. / Corman, Jessica R.; Moody, Eric K.; Elser, James.

In: Biogeochemistry, Vol. 126, No. 3, 01.12.2015, p. 285-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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