Stimulus factors influencing the identification of voiced stop consonants by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired adults

Julie Mapes Lindholm, Michael Dorman, Bonnie Ellen Taylor, Maureen T. Hannley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    29 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    The effects of mild-to-moderate hearing impairment on the perceptual importance of three acoustic correlates of stop consonant place of articulation were examined. Normal-hearing and hearing-impaired adults identified a stimulus set comprising all possible combinations of the levels of three factors: formant transition type (three levels), spectral tilt type (three levels), and abruptness of frequency change (two levels). The levels of these factors correspond to those appropriate for /b/, /d/, and /g/ in the /ae/ environment. Normal-hearing subjects responded primarily in accord with the place of articulation specified by the formant transitions. Hearing-impaired subjects showed less-than-normal reliance on formant transitions and greater-than-normal reliance on spectral tilt and abruptness of frequency change. These results suggest that hearing impairment affects the perceptual importance of cues to stop consonant identity, increasing the importance of information provided by both temporal characteristics and gross spectral shape and decreasing the importance of information provided by the formant transitions. PACS numbers: 43.7l.Ky, 43.71.Es.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1608-1614
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Volume83
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 1988

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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