Abstract

The relationship between living in impoverished neighborhoods and poor health is well established, but impacts of neighborhood stigma on health are not well understood. Drawing on long-term research with Latino immigrants, we examine how neighborhood stigma and social bonding affect health in Phoenix, Arizona. During preliminary ethnographic analysis, we developed a novel neighborhood stigma scale. In survey research, we examined effects of neighborhood stigma and social bonding on self-reported physical and mental health. Regression models show that perceived neighborhood stigma and low social bonding are associated with poorer physical and mental health, controlling for other factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)556-577
Number of pages22
JournalMedical Anthropology Quarterly
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Social Stigma
Health
health
Mental Health
mental health
survey research
Hispanic Americans
Research
Object Attachment
Stigma
immigrant
regression
Physical Health

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Health
  • Immigrants
  • Neighborhoods
  • Social capital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Anthropology
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts

Cite this

Stigmatized neighborhoods, social bonding, and health. / Wutich, Amber; Ruth, Alissa; Slade, Alexandra; Boone, Christopher.

In: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.12.2014, p. 556-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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