Stereotype content model across cultures: Towards universal similarities and some differences

Amy J.C. Cuddy, Susan T. Fiske, Virginia S.Y. Kwan, Peter Glick, Stéphanie Demoulin, Jacques Philippe Leyens, Michael Harris Bond, Jean Claude Croizet, Naomi Ellemers, Ed Sleebos, Tin Tin Htun, Hyun Jeong Kim, Greg Maio, Judi Perry, Kristina Petkova, Valery Todorov, Rosa Rodríguez-Bailón, Elena Morales, Miguel Moya, Marisol PalaciosVanessa Smith, Rolando Perez, Jorge Vala, Rene Ziegler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

431 Scopus citations

Abstract

The stereotype content model (SCM) proposes potentially universal principles of societal stereotypes and their relation to social structure. Here, the SCM reveals theoretically grounded, cross-cultural, cross-groups similarities and one difference across 10 non-US nations. Seven European (individualist) and three East Asian (collectivist) nations (N = 1; 028) support three hypothesized cross-cultural similarities: (a) perceived warmth and competence reliably differentiate societal group stereotypes; (b) many out-groups receive ambivalent stereotypes (high on one dimension; low on the other); and (c) high status groups stereotypically are competent, whereas competitive groups stereotypically lack warmth. Data uncover one consequential cross-cultural difference: (d) the more collectivist cultures do not locate reference groups (in-groups and societal prototype groups) in the most positive cluster (high-competence/high-warmth), unlike individualist cultures. This demonstrates out-group derogation without obvious reference-group favouritism. The SCM can serve as a pancultural tool for predicting group stereotypes from structural relations with other groups in society, and comparing across societies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-33
Number of pages33
JournalBritish Journal of Social Psychology
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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