Step counts of non-white minority children and youth by gender, grade level, race/ethnicity, and mode of school transportation

Tyler G. Johnson, Timothy A. Brusseau, Paul W. Darst, Pamela Kulinna, Janel White-Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The purposes of this study were to describe and analyze the steps/d of nonwhite minority children and youth by gender, grade level, race/ethnicity, and mode of school transportation. A secondary purpose was to compare the steps/d of minority children and youth to their Caucasian grade-level counterparts. Methods: Participants were 547 minority youth grades 5 to 8 from 4 urban schools. Participants wore sealed pedometers for 6 consecutive week/school days. Three hundred and ten participants responded to a questionnaire concerning their mode of transportation to and from school. Results: Statistical analyses indicated a main effect for gender (F(3, 546) = 13.50, P<.001) with no interaction. Boys (12,589 ± 3921) accumulated significantly more steps/d than girls (9,539 ± 3,135). Further analyses also revealed a significant main effect for mode of school transportation (F(2, 309) = 15.97, P≤.001). Walkers (12,614 ± 4169) obtained significantly more steps/d than car (10,021 ± 2856) or bus (10,230 ± 3666) transit users. Conclusions: Minority boys obtain similar steps/d as their Caucasian grade-level counterparts; minority girls obtain less steps/d than their Caucasian grade-level counterparts. Minority youth who actively commute are more likely to meet PA recommendations than nonactive commuters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)730-736
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Children
  • Pedometer
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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