Stable passivations for high-efficiency silicon solar cells

P. E. Gruenbaum, J. Y. Gan, Richard King, R. M. Swanson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Initial designs of single-crystal silicon point-contact solar cells have shown a degradation in their efficiency after being exposed to concentrated sunlight. The main mechanism appears to be an increase in recombination centers at the Si/SiO2 interface due to ultraviolet light photoinjecting electrons from the silicon conduction band into the silicon dioxide that passivates the cell's front surface. Trichloroethane, texturization, and aluminum during the forming gas anneal all contribute to the instability of the interface. A reasonably good resistance to UV light can be obtained by putting a phosphorus diffusion at the surface and can be improved further by stripping off the deposited oxide after the diffusion and regrowing a dry thermal oxide. A second technique, which utilizes ultrathin oxides and thin polysilicon films and can yield stable point-contact solar cells that are more efficient at higher concentrations, is also described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference Record of the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages317-322
Number of pages6
Volume1
StatePublished - May 1990
Externally publishedYes
EventTwenty First IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference - 1990 Part 2 (of 2) - Kissimimee, FL, USA
Duration: May 21 1990May 25 1990

Other

OtherTwenty First IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference - 1990 Part 2 (of 2)
CityKissimimee, FL, USA
Period5/21/905/25/90

Fingerprint

Silicon solar cells
Passivation
passivity
solar cells
Point contacts
Oxides
oxides
Solar cells
Silicon
silicon
sunlight
stripping
Conduction bands
Polysilicon
Ultraviolet radiation
ultraviolet radiation
phosphorus
Phosphorus
conduction bands
Silica

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Gruenbaum, P. E., Gan, J. Y., King, R., & Swanson, R. M. (1990). Stable passivations for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In Conference Record of the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (Vol. 1, pp. 317-322). Publ by IEEE.

Stable passivations for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. / Gruenbaum, P. E.; Gan, J. Y.; King, Richard; Swanson, R. M.

Conference Record of the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference. Vol. 1 Publ by IEEE, 1990. p. 317-322.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gruenbaum, PE, Gan, JY, King, R & Swanson, RM 1990, Stable passivations for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. in Conference Record of the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference. vol. 1, Publ by IEEE, pp. 317-322, Twenty First IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference - 1990 Part 2 (of 2), Kissimimee, FL, USA, 5/21/90.
Gruenbaum PE, Gan JY, King R, Swanson RM. Stable passivations for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In Conference Record of the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference. Vol. 1. Publ by IEEE. 1990. p. 317-322
Gruenbaum, P. E. ; Gan, J. Y. ; King, Richard ; Swanson, R. M. / Stable passivations for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Conference Record of the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference. Vol. 1 Publ by IEEE, 1990. pp. 317-322
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