Sport And Downtown Development Strategy If You Build It, Will Jobs Come?

MARK S. ROSENTRAUB, David Swindell, MICHAEL PRZYBYLSKI, DANIEL R. MULLINS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Many policy analysts have cautioned against public spending for professional and amateur sports. Within the last year, numerous cities have received demands from major and minor league teams for investments. These investments by the public sector can involve hundreds of millions of dollars and are usually defended by the economic impact of the facilities or teams and the economic development and revitalization which will follow. Indianapolis formulated an economic development strategy which relied substantially on sports. In addition, its development policies did not involve one team or facility, but a series of investments. As a result, the policies followed in Indianapolis afford an opportunity to measure the ability of sport facilities to encourage other investments and enhance economic development. The results reported here indicate that a sports strategy, even one as pronounced and as articulated as that of Indianapolis, is likely to have an inconsequential impact on development and economic growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-239
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Urban Affairs
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

development strategy
city center
sport
Sports
economic development
sports facility
economics
public spending
amateur
economic impact
public sector
dollar
development policy
economic growth
ability
policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Sport And Downtown Development Strategy If You Build It, Will Jobs Come? / ROSENTRAUB, MARK S.; Swindell, David; PRZYBYLSKI, MICHAEL; MULLINS, DANIEL R.

In: Journal of Urban Affairs, Vol. 16, No. 3, 1994, p. 221-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ROSENTRAUB, MARK S. ; Swindell, David ; PRZYBYLSKI, MICHAEL ; MULLINS, DANIEL R. / Sport And Downtown Development Strategy If You Build It, Will Jobs Come?. In: Journal of Urban Affairs. 1994 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 221-239.
@article{2465e5143e9b42e798d622f3b8ce1fa8,
title = "Sport And Downtown Development Strategy If You Build It, Will Jobs Come?",
abstract = "ABSTRACT: Many policy analysts have cautioned against public spending for professional and amateur sports. Within the last year, numerous cities have received demands from major and minor league teams for investments. These investments by the public sector can involve hundreds of millions of dollars and are usually defended by the economic impact of the facilities or teams and the economic development and revitalization which will follow. Indianapolis formulated an economic development strategy which relied substantially on sports. In addition, its development policies did not involve one team or facility, but a series of investments. As a result, the policies followed in Indianapolis afford an opportunity to measure the ability of sport facilities to encourage other investments and enhance economic development. The results reported here indicate that a sports strategy, even one as pronounced and as articulated as that of Indianapolis, is likely to have an inconsequential impact on development and economic growth.",
author = "ROSENTRAUB, {MARK S.} and David Swindell and MICHAEL PRZYBYLSKI and MULLINS, {DANIEL R.}",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9906.1994.tb00327.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "221--239",
journal = "Journal of Urban Affairs",
issn = "0735-2166",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sport And Downtown Development Strategy If You Build It, Will Jobs Come?

AU - ROSENTRAUB, MARK S.

AU - Swindell, David

AU - PRZYBYLSKI, MICHAEL

AU - MULLINS, DANIEL R.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - ABSTRACT: Many policy analysts have cautioned against public spending for professional and amateur sports. Within the last year, numerous cities have received demands from major and minor league teams for investments. These investments by the public sector can involve hundreds of millions of dollars and are usually defended by the economic impact of the facilities or teams and the economic development and revitalization which will follow. Indianapolis formulated an economic development strategy which relied substantially on sports. In addition, its development policies did not involve one team or facility, but a series of investments. As a result, the policies followed in Indianapolis afford an opportunity to measure the ability of sport facilities to encourage other investments and enhance economic development. The results reported here indicate that a sports strategy, even one as pronounced and as articulated as that of Indianapolis, is likely to have an inconsequential impact on development and economic growth.

AB - ABSTRACT: Many policy analysts have cautioned against public spending for professional and amateur sports. Within the last year, numerous cities have received demands from major and minor league teams for investments. These investments by the public sector can involve hundreds of millions of dollars and are usually defended by the economic impact of the facilities or teams and the economic development and revitalization which will follow. Indianapolis formulated an economic development strategy which relied substantially on sports. In addition, its development policies did not involve one team or facility, but a series of investments. As a result, the policies followed in Indianapolis afford an opportunity to measure the ability of sport facilities to encourage other investments and enhance economic development. The results reported here indicate that a sports strategy, even one as pronounced and as articulated as that of Indianapolis, is likely to have an inconsequential impact on development and economic growth.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989636742&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84989636742&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9906.1994.tb00327.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9906.1994.tb00327.x

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 221

EP - 239

JO - Journal of Urban Affairs

JF - Journal of Urban Affairs

SN - 0735-2166

IS - 3

ER -