Abstract

Dealloying, the selective dissolution of one or more of the elemental components of an alloy, is an important corrosion mechanism and a technologically relevant process used to fabricate nanoporous metals for a variety of applications including catalysis, sensing, actuation, supercapacitors and radiation-damage-resistant materials. In noble-metal alloy systems for which the ambienterature solid-state diffusivity is minuscule, dealloying occurs at a composition-dependent critical potential above which bicontinuous nanoporous structures evolve and below which a full-coverage layer of the more-noble component forms causing the alloy surface to become passive. In contrast, for alloy systems exhibiting significant solid-state diffusive transport, our understanding of dealloying-induced morphologies and the electrochemical parameters controlling this are largely unexplored. Here, we examine dealloying of Li from Li-Sn alloys and show that depending on alloy composition, particle size and dealloying rate, all known dealloyed morphologies evolve including bicontinuous nanoporous structures and hollow core-shell particles. Furthermore, we elucidate the role of bulk diffusion in morphology evolution using chronopotentiometry and linear sweep voltammetry. Our results may have implications for lithium-ion battery development while significantly broadening the spectrum of strategies for obtaining new nanoporous materials through dealloying.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1102-1106
Number of pages5
JournalNature Materials
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Nanostructures
solid state
Radiation damage
electrochemical capacitors
Voltammetry
Precious metals
noble metals
Chemical analysis
actuation
radiation damage
Catalysis
catalysis
diffusivity
electric batteries
hollow
corrosion
dissolving
Dissolution
lithium
Metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Spontaneous evolution of bicontinuous nanostructures in dealloyed Li-based systems. / Chen, Qing; Sieradzki, Karl.

In: Nature Materials, Vol. 12, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 1102-1106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e3c3b1fb567848948b8ed7ec3692304f,
title = "Spontaneous evolution of bicontinuous nanostructures in dealloyed Li-based systems",
abstract = "Dealloying, the selective dissolution of one or more of the elemental components of an alloy, is an important corrosion mechanism and a technologically relevant process used to fabricate nanoporous metals for a variety of applications including catalysis, sensing, actuation, supercapacitors and radiation-damage-resistant materials. In noble-metal alloy systems for which the ambienterature solid-state diffusivity is minuscule, dealloying occurs at a composition-dependent critical potential above which bicontinuous nanoporous structures evolve and below which a full-coverage layer of the more-noble component forms causing the alloy surface to become passive. In contrast, for alloy systems exhibiting significant solid-state diffusive transport, our understanding of dealloying-induced morphologies and the electrochemical parameters controlling this are largely unexplored. Here, we examine dealloying of Li from Li-Sn alloys and show that depending on alloy composition, particle size and dealloying rate, all known dealloyed morphologies evolve including bicontinuous nanoporous structures and hollow core-shell particles. Furthermore, we elucidate the role of bulk diffusion in morphology evolution using chronopotentiometry and linear sweep voltammetry. Our results may have implications for lithium-ion battery development while significantly broadening the spectrum of strategies for obtaining new nanoporous materials through dealloying.",
author = "Qing Chen and Karl Sieradzki",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1038/nmat3741",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "1102--1106",
journal = "Nature Materials",
issn = "1476-1122",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spontaneous evolution of bicontinuous nanostructures in dealloyed Li-based systems

AU - Chen, Qing

AU - Sieradzki, Karl

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - Dealloying, the selective dissolution of one or more of the elemental components of an alloy, is an important corrosion mechanism and a technologically relevant process used to fabricate nanoporous metals for a variety of applications including catalysis, sensing, actuation, supercapacitors and radiation-damage-resistant materials. In noble-metal alloy systems for which the ambienterature solid-state diffusivity is minuscule, dealloying occurs at a composition-dependent critical potential above which bicontinuous nanoporous structures evolve and below which a full-coverage layer of the more-noble component forms causing the alloy surface to become passive. In contrast, for alloy systems exhibiting significant solid-state diffusive transport, our understanding of dealloying-induced morphologies and the electrochemical parameters controlling this are largely unexplored. Here, we examine dealloying of Li from Li-Sn alloys and show that depending on alloy composition, particle size and dealloying rate, all known dealloyed morphologies evolve including bicontinuous nanoporous structures and hollow core-shell particles. Furthermore, we elucidate the role of bulk diffusion in morphology evolution using chronopotentiometry and linear sweep voltammetry. Our results may have implications for lithium-ion battery development while significantly broadening the spectrum of strategies for obtaining new nanoporous materials through dealloying.

AB - Dealloying, the selective dissolution of one or more of the elemental components of an alloy, is an important corrosion mechanism and a technologically relevant process used to fabricate nanoporous metals for a variety of applications including catalysis, sensing, actuation, supercapacitors and radiation-damage-resistant materials. In noble-metal alloy systems for which the ambienterature solid-state diffusivity is minuscule, dealloying occurs at a composition-dependent critical potential above which bicontinuous nanoporous structures evolve and below which a full-coverage layer of the more-noble component forms causing the alloy surface to become passive. In contrast, for alloy systems exhibiting significant solid-state diffusive transport, our understanding of dealloying-induced morphologies and the electrochemical parameters controlling this are largely unexplored. Here, we examine dealloying of Li from Li-Sn alloys and show that depending on alloy composition, particle size and dealloying rate, all known dealloyed morphologies evolve including bicontinuous nanoporous structures and hollow core-shell particles. Furthermore, we elucidate the role of bulk diffusion in morphology evolution using chronopotentiometry and linear sweep voltammetry. Our results may have implications for lithium-ion battery development while significantly broadening the spectrum of strategies for obtaining new nanoporous materials through dealloying.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84888200263&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84888200263&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/nmat3741

DO - 10.1038/nmat3741

M3 - Article

C2 - 23975058

AN - SCOPUS:84888200263

VL - 12

SP - 1102

EP - 1106

JO - Nature Materials

JF - Nature Materials

SN - 1476-1122

IS - 12

ER -