Spirituality as a coping resource: The experiences of professional black women

Denise N.A. Bacchus, Lynn Holley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Qualitative findings from face-to-face interviews of a subset of participants in a large quantitative study are used to explore the perspectives of 10 professional Black women (PBW) regarding their definitions of spirituality and their experiences using this resource to cope with work-related stress. Findings include that many PBW do not differentiate between spirituality and religion and that they utilize spirituality-particularly prayer, meditation, and inspirational readings-to gain personal strength, inner peace, and guidance and to reflect on and reappraise stressful situations in the workplace. Further, many PBW view spirituality as a problem-focused, rather than an emotion-focused, coping strategy. Implications for social work practice and future research are offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-84
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 26 2004

Fingerprint

Spirituality
spirituality
coping
Religion
resources
experience
Meditation
meditation
Social Work
Workplace
Reading
peace
Emotions
social work
emotion
workplace
Interviews
interview

Keywords

  • Coping resources
  • Professional black women
  • Spirituality
  • Stress and coping
  • Ways of coping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education

Cite this

Spirituality as a coping resource : The experiences of professional black women. / Bacchus, Denise N.A.; Holley, Lynn.

In: Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work, Vol. 13, No. 4, 26.04.2004, p. 65-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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