Spirituality and religion: Intertwined protective factors for substance use among urban American Indian youth

Stephen Kulis, David Hodge, Stephanie L. Ayers, Eddie F. Brown, Flavio Marsiglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and objective: This article explores the aspects of spirituality and religious involvement that may be the protective factors against substance use among urban American Indian (AI) youth. Methods: Data come from AI youth (N 123) in five urban middle schools in a southwestern metropolis. Results: Ordinary least squares regression analyses indicated that following Christian beliefs and belonging to the Native American Church were associated with lower levels of substance use. Conclusions and Scientific Significance: Following AI traditional spiritual beliefs was associated with antidrug attitudes, norms, and expectancies. Having a sense of belonging to traditions from both AI cultures and Christianity may foster integration of the two worlds in which urban AI youth live.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-449
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Native American
  • Religion
  • Spirituality
  • Substance use
  • Urban American Indian
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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