Spirituality and Religion among the General Public: Implications for Social Work Discourse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conceptualizations play a central role in social work discourse, shaping actions in the areas of practice, research, and education. Although many formulations of spirituality and religion have been advanced by social work scholars, the views of members of the general public have been largely absent from the professional conversation. The present article adds to the profession's evolving discussion on spirituality and religion by describing common understandings of spirituality and religion among the general population and by discussing the implication of these views for social work discourse on spirituality and religion. By understanding common views among the public, the social work profession is better positioned to provide ethical and professional services that respect clients' spiritual beliefs and values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-227
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Work (United States)
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Spirituality
Religion
Social Work
spirituality
social work
discourse
profession
research practice
respect
conversation
Education
Research
Population
Values
education

Keywords

  • clients
  • religion
  • social work discourse
  • spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Spirituality and Religion among the General Public : Implications for Social Work Discourse. / Hodge, David.

In: Social Work (United States), Vol. 60, No. 3, 01.07.2015, p. 219-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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