Speech understanding in complex listening environments by listeners fit with cochlear implants

Michael Dorman, Rene H. Gifford

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this article is to summarize recent published and unpublished research from our 2 laboratories on improving speech understanding in complex listening environments by listeners fit with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: CI listeners were tested in 2 listening environments. One was a simulation of a restaurant with multiple, diffuse noise sources, and the other was a cocktail party with 2 spatially separated point sources of competing speech. At issue was the value of the following sources of information, or interventions, on speech understanding: (a) visual information, (b) adaptive beamformer microphones and remote microphones, (c) bimodal fittings, that is, a CI and contralateral low-frequency acoustic hearing, (d) hearing preservation fittings, that is, a CI with preserved low-frequency acoustic in the same ear plus low-frequency acoustic hearing in the contralateral ear, and (e) bilateral CIs. Results: A remote microphone provided the largest improvement in speech understanding. Visual information and adaptive beamformers ranked next, while bimodal fittings, bilateral fittings, and hearing preservation provided significant but less benefit than the other interventions or sources of information. Only bilateral CIs allowed listeners high levels of speech understanding when signals were roved over the frontal plane. Conclusions: The evidence supports the use of bilateral CIs and hearing preservation surgery for best speech understanding in complex environments. These fittings, when combined with visual information and microphone technology, should lead to high levels of speech understanding by CI patients in complex listening environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3019-3026
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume60
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Cochlear Implants
listener
Hearing
acoustics
Acoustics
source of information
Ear
Restaurants
Listeners
Cochlear Implant
surgery
Noise
simulation
Technology
evidence
Values
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Speech understanding in complex listening environments by listeners fit with cochlear implants. / Dorman, Michael; Gifford, Rene H.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 60, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 3019-3026.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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