Spatial dynamics of nesting behavior

Lizards shift microhabitats to construct nests with beneficial thermal properties

Michael Angilletta, Michael W. Sears, Robert M. Pringle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because temperature affects the growth, development, and survival of embryos, oviparous mothers should discriminate carefully among available nesting sites. We combined a radiotelemetric study of animal movements with a spatial mapping of environmental temperatures to test predictions about the nesting behavior of the eastern fence lizard (Sceloporus undulatus). Females made large excursions from their typical home ranges to construct nests in exposed substrates. These excursions appeared to be related solely to nesting because all females returned to forested habitat immediately afterward. On average,

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2933-2939
Number of pages7
JournalEcology
Volume90
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sceloporus undulatus
nesting behavior
thermal properties
lizard
microhabitat
microhabitats
lizards
nest
nests
home range
growth and development
nesting sites
embryo
ambient temperature
embryo (animal)
temperature
substrate
prediction
animal
habitat

Keywords

  • Artificial neural network
  • Eastern fence lizard
  • Microhabitat
  • Nesting
  • Reptiles
  • Sceloporus undulatus
  • Temperature
  • Thermoregulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Spatial dynamics of nesting behavior : Lizards shift microhabitats to construct nests with beneficial thermal properties. / Angilletta, Michael; Sears, Michael W.; Pringle, Robert M.

In: Ecology, Vol. 90, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 2933-2939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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